Posts tagged "Windows Update"

Windows 8.1 (Blue) will be a free update

According to the official Windows blog Windows “Blue” will indeed be named Window 8.1 and that it will be free for current Windows 8 consumers through the Windows Store.

So through the Windows Store, that is interesting not Windows Update.

It seems logical that enterprises can use their WSUS or any other deployment method, so I assume it will be available as a stand alone download.

 

Source: The Windows Blog

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 75286 times by 7714 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - May 20, 2013 at 2:49 pm

Categories: Windows8   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Surface Pro firmware and driver pack

      Cumulative

firmware

      and

drivers

      for the

Surface Pro

      . This firmware and driver package contains drivers for all of the components in the Surface Pro device, as well as updates to the system firmware that have been released via

Windows Update

      . These drivers and firmware are not compatible with Surface

RT

    .
      Use these drivers and firmware to prepare your custom images for enterprise deployment, or to repair problems with custom installations of

Windows 8 Pro

    on your Surface Pro device.

 

Download

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 68955 times by 7191 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - May 20, 2013 at 2:48 pm

Categories: Uncategorized   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Update Rollups for Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 are NOT cumulative

If you pay attention to the updates Microsoft rolls out each month or take note of what Windows Updates are on your Windows 8 PC or Windows Server 2012 Server, you may have seen some monthly rollup updates.

These update rollups are not cumulative updates. You do need to apply each of the monthly update rollups to get the fixes and enhancements from each month. Installing the February 2013 Update Rollup does not get you the January 2013 to October 2012 rollup updates. This is to say, these rollups are independent of each other. Searching on the KB number will discuss what each rollup is addressing that month. Note that these updates do not focus on a particular component as we have seen with previous cumulative or rollup type updates but are broader to Windows.

Continue at source:

Update Rollups For Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 Explained – Ask Premier Field Engineeri

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 69387 times by 6936 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - May 20, 2013 at 2:46 pm

Categories: Microsoft   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Windows 8.1 (Blue) will be a free update

According to the official Windows blog Windows “Blue” will indeed be named Window 8.1 and that it will be free for current Windows 8 consumers through the Windows Store.

So through the Windows Store, that is interesting not Windows Update.

It seems logical that enterprises can use their WSUS or any other deployment method, so I assume it will be available as a stand alone download.

 

Source: The Windows Blog

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 70024 times by 7336 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - May 16, 2013 at 11:39 am

Categories: Uncategorized   Tags: , , , , , , ,

First updates for Windows 8 RTM released

Microsoft posted the first (public) updates for Windows 8:

An update is available to correct tile logo images of files on the All Apps View.

 

Assume that you add the shortcut for a file to the All Apps View in Windows 8, Windows RT or Windows Server 2012.  After you change the file association of the file type, the tile logo image is not updated accordingly in the All Apps View.

KB: An update is available to correct tile logo images of files on the All Apps View

 

Also Microsoft published the EU browser choice Screen update for Windows 8.

KB: What is the Browser Choice update (KB976002) – Microsoft Windows

Both updates are available through Microsoft Update app.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 39168 times by 6705 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - September 17, 2012 at 7:49 am

Categories: Windows8   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Minimizing restarts after automatic updating in Windows 8

Windows 8 team blog:

Windows Update and handling restarts on Windows 8

….we made the following improvements to the Windows 8 updating experience.

WU will consolidate all the restarts in a month, synchronizing with the monthly security release. This means that your PC will only restart when security updates are installed and require a restart. With this improvement, it does not matter when updates that require restarts are released in a month, since these restarts will wait till the security release. Since security updates are released in a single batch on the second Tuesday of every month, you are then getting essentially one restart a month. This simplification helps in three ways: it keeps the system secure in a timely manner, reduces restarts, and makes restarts more predictable.

There is one exception to the rule to wait for the monthly security release, and that is in the case of critical security update to fix a worm-like vulnerability (for example, a Blaster worm). In that case, WU will not wait, but will go ahead and download, install, and restart automatically. But this will happen only when the security threat is dire enough.

WU notifies you of any upcoming automatic restart. Let’s assume that WU has already detected, downloaded, and installed security updates, and now requires a restart. Windows Update will notify you of an upcoming automatic restart through a message on the login screen that will persist for 3 days. Because the majority of update activity occurs in the first three days of the release of each update [see Figure1], we wanted to give you 3 days to allow you to restart at your own convenience. You would restart by selecting “Update and shutdown” or “Update and restart” on the login screen, or by going to Windows Update in the Control Panel. You will no longer see any pop-up notifications or dialogs about pending restarts. Instead, the message appears in a more visible and appropriate place (the log-in screen). The use of the login screen has become ubiquitous even in home environments, as more and more machines become portable.

Here is a timeline view of that experience:

1. A message about the upcoming restart is shown in the login screen for three days or until the PC is restarted (whichever is sooner). This means you now have three days to restart the PC at your convenience. All you need to do is see the login screen once in 3 days to see the message about the upcoming restart and by default the lock screen will appear after 15-minute idle timeout.

Message near power button reads: Windows Update, Your PC will restart in 2 days to finish installing updates.

2. In addition to the restart notification on the login screen, the Power options on the lock screen will change to “Update and restart” immediately after the update occurs, and will include “Update and shutdown” on days two and three, to make the message even more apparent to you. This allows you to restart your PC at your own convenience.

Power options: Sleep, Shut down, Update and restart.

 

3. If after three days, the restart still has not occurred, then WU will automatically restart your PC for you. In this case, the automatic restart will happen either at the end of the three-day grace period, or, to prevent data loss if WU detects that there are critical applications open at the end of the three-day grace period, it will wait to automatically restart the next time you login. I’ll address this behavior in more depth in the next section.

Your PC will restart in 13 minutes, 28 seconds. Restart / Close

4. After the restart has occurred, the message on the login screen will go away and the power options will revert to the original choices. We know people would like Windows to automatically log in after the restart, but we strongly advise against doing so, given the potential security issues with this configuration.

 

Delay the automatic restart if there is potential of losing user data. If the PC has hit the three-day deadline and still needs an automatic restart, WU will only automatically restart the machine if there is no chance of losing the user’s data. That means, if you are not at your PC (i.e. it is locked), if you have applications running in the background, or if there is potentially unsaved work, WU delays the automatic restart until the next time you come back to your machine and log in. At log-in, you will be asked to save your work, and you’ll see a warning that the machine will be restarted within 15 minutes.

Ensure minimal interruption to user activity. Having a restart notification or dialog pop up in the middle of an important presentation, a game or a movie is not a pleasant situation, to say the least. When attempting to automatically restart the PC, if you are in presentation mode, playing a game, or watching a movie full-screen, WU detects this state, and delays the automatic restart until the next available opportune moment or the next time you log back in to the PC.

The experience for business users. For PCs in an enterprise setting, if no policy has been set by the IT administrator, the updating experience is exactly the same as it is for home users. However, an IT administrator can set a policy to prevent auto-restart after automatic installs (just as in Windows 7). If they set this policy, there will be no three-day countdown and no automatic restart. Instead, users will see a message on the login screen indicating that the PC needs to be restarted, and the message persists until the restart occurs. This informs users that a restart is required while keeping them in control of when to restart.

Windows Update, Your PC needs to restart to finish installing security updates.

The experience for users in “notify mode.” I also want to address the experience for users who have chosen to be notified before downloading or installing updates (5.82% of the WU user base from Figure2). For a user in this “notify mode,” a message will be shown on the login screen. If you choose to be notified before downloading updates, you will see the login screen message saying “Important updates are ready to be installed” when updates are ready to be downloaded. If you choose to be notified before install, you will see the same login screen message after updates are downloaded, but before they are installed. In either case, you won’t see the message about a pending restart on the login screen since installation is not automatic.

Windows Update, Important updates are ready to be installed.

Cumulatively, these improvements help us achieve the balance we are striving for with Windows Update – keeping the PC (and PC ecosystem) up-to-date, without an intrusive experience.

Full Story:

Minimizing restarts after automatic updating in Windows Update – Building Windows 8 – Site H

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 18197 times by 3738 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - December 5, 2011 at 11:59 am

Categories: Windows8   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers