Posts tagged "Firefox"

Remove Qone8

Remove Qone8

October 17, 2013

Qone8 is a browser highjacker.  This is commonly referred to as the Qone8 virus.  In most cases users have their browser default home page changed to Qone8 search page.  This search page has ads on it that make Qone8 money.

People are paid money to spread this highjack.  They spread Qone8 via download packages.  This download package normally contains a free toolbar or free games download.

To avoid getting infected with Qone8 you can either ignore free games and toolbars or you have to use an antivirus client that can detect such threats and block the install of the threat or easily remove the threat.  The program RemoveVirus.org has been recommending now for over a year is SpyHunter.  This antivirus client stops ALL programs from changing your home page and will stop the Qone8 virus in it’s tracks.

No clear damage is being done by this Highjacker to the main operating system files.  By the strictest definition of a computer virus this is not really a virus.  A browser hijacker can be a virus but this is more adware then anything else.  Still it’s annoying as hell and if your on our website you want it removed.

Qone8 Highjacker effects several browsers including Chrome, Internet Explorer and Firefox.

Manual Directions to Remove Qone8 From All Three Browsers

Words of Caution:  While manual removal is possible you have to run a virus scan.  If Qone8 is on your system you most likely have other items on your computer as well.  We recommend you scan with Spyhunter which can be downloaded here.  If you purchase the client it can automatically remove Qone8 for you.  The free version still will offer some protection and prevent your home page from being highjacked in the future.

Remove Qone8 From Computer

Go to the Windows Control Panel and uninstall the software.

Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs. If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.

You may be asked to re-boot the computer after the program has been uninstalled.

Remove Qone8  Chrome

1. Click on Customize and control Google Chrome icon in the top right section of the Chrome Browser and then select Settings.

2. Click Set pages under the On startup.

3. Remove Qone8.com by clicking the “X” icon on the far right side of the Qon8 URL

4. Click Show Home button under Appearance and then select the Change Button.

5. Select Use The New Tab Page or change the Qon8.com URL to whatever you want the home page to be.

6. Click Manager search engines button under Search.

7.  Select the search engine you want to be the default search engine.  Then after you change the default you can now go to the Qone8 URL and select the X Icon at the end of the URL to remove it.

You may need to re-boot your computer.  Be Sure to run a full scan using Spyhunter as linked above in this guide.

Remove Qone8 Internet Explorer

1. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons.

2. In the Dialog box on the left select Search Providers . On the right side a list of providers will appear.  Select the Search Engine you want as the default and then click the Set As Default button on the bottom.

3.  In the same box to the right.  Select Qone8 from the list and then click the Remove button.

4.  If you have a shortcut to open Internet Explorer on the Desktop, right click the desktop icon for Internet Explorer and select Properties.

Under the Shortcut Tab, you will see the Qone8 url after iexplore.exe”.  Remove everything after iexplore.exe”

5.  Now go to Tools  and then Internet Options.  In the Home Page Box.  Type in the home page you want to use when you open Internet Explorer.  Select OK.

You may need to re-boot your computer.  Be Sure to run a full scan using Spyhunter as linked above in this guide.

Remove Qone8 Firefox

1. Type about:config in the URL bar (This is where you normally enter a website name ) and hit Enter.

Click the I’ll be careful, I promise! button.

In the search box Type in Qone8 and press enter

Right click on each of the found search queries for Qone8 and Select Reset

2. Where the Qone8 Search box is in the main browser Window, click the down arrow next to the Icon and select Manage Search Engines

Click on Qone8 from Manage Search Engine List Dialog box and select the Remove Button

4. On Your Desktop you may have a shortcut going to Firefox.  Right click the Firefox Icon on the Desktop and select Properties

Click the Shortcut Tab

Inside the Target: field you will notice that the Qone8.com URL is present of a Firefox/firfeox.exe”  Remove everything after the firefox” string and hit save.

You may need to re-boot your computer.  Be Sure to run a full scan using Spyhunter as linked above in this guide.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 32379 times by 8367 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - January 8, 2014 at 2:59 pm

Categories: VIRUS   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Pirate Bay’s Anti-Censorship Browser Clocks 1,000,000 Downloads

The Pirate Bay’s PirateBrowser, a tool that allows people to bypass ISP filtering and access blocked websites, is a great success. The Firefox and Tor-based software eliminates the need to use a proxy site and has already been downloaded more than 1,000,000 times, TorrentFreak has learned. Currently around 0.5% of all Pirate Bay visitors use PirateBrowser to access the infamous torrent site

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 40882 times by 9008 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - October 20, 2013 at 1:52 pm

Categories: Pirate Bay   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Has Conduit hijacked your browser? Here are instructions fro deleting it>>!!!

Conduit sells search engines to sites that install the engine to hijack home  pages. I purchased a product from Ashampoo, and rejected the option to install  the Bing Ashampoo search bar, yet it was installed. The code of my hijacked home  page is http://search.conduit.com/?ctid=CT2475029&SearchSource=13. Conduit  evidently is in some partnership of revenue sharing of the hijacked home pages.  A Web of Trust search will show many complaints from users. Conduit Engine shows  up in my add/remove programs, but failed to uninstall, and the “uninstall” was  preceded by some direct script code that quickly popped up and then disappeared,  I assume so that the search bar cannot truly be uninstalled.
A Google  search of Conduit Engine will result in complaints by users who want to  uninstall the search engine, but are having problems.
Because my edit  varies greatly from the advertiser’s own description below, I will leave their  ad, until more research can be done, that justifies taking their advertising  down. Do be aware that they are associated with home page hijacking and spyware, to  persons who do not desire to have their engine. I have discovered this from Web  of Trust and Google. I hope to have my answer improved, once I have discovered  how to have their spyware removed. I welcome any answers that can improve upon  mine. I will also post how to remove the engine once I am successful.

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_conduit_engine#ixzz1lbvRrEvj

 

Conduit bundles a hidden “toolbar” and other apps with other companies’ software,  pays them a kickback because they are willing to hide from the end user that  Conduit products are being allowed to install secretly alongside what the user  actually wanted.
The outcry is widespread but they seem to still be  getting away with it.
They pretend to address the issue here  http://www.conduit.com/Community/Forum/Questions.aspx?fpage=10&threadid=8423
But it is clear that the attempt is  disingenuous.http://forums.cnet.com/7723-6122_102-504164.html
In my  case, Bit Torrent did me the disservice. I thought they were still the open  source industry leader in free and reliable torrent apps, but I was clearly  mistaken. Had to uninstall secretly included addons in all browsers, as well as  removing toolbars and hidden client apps via Add/Remove function. Seems to have  worked. We’ll see.
Their claims are below…   ==================================
Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_conduit_engine#ixzz1lbvdmEny

 

HOW to delete:

If you are using Firefox, uninstall it from the addons.
Users are reporting that Revo Uninstaller having success in uninstalling Conduit. Download Revo Uninstaller Freeware – Free and Full Download – Uninstall software, remove programs, solve uninstall problems

If it still will not delete/

 

Boot computer up into safemode and then delete it.  That shouod work.

 

1) To get rid of the Toolbar / widget things, you need to go to Tools > Add-ons > Plugins, and uninstall the two entries pertaining to BitTorrent and Conduit. You will need to restart Firefox twice for this. Check that they are both gone when you have restarted.

2) To remove the Search Box hijack, click on the down-arrow next to the search box (it will probably have a Google symbol next to it) and select Manage Search Engines. Then select any search engine you don’t like the look of or recognise – you will be surprised how many there are – and for each one click Remove.

3) They were the easy bits. Now to remove the Conduit Engine itself.

You need to have Firefox shut down for this, as it restores some of the files upon shutdown to prevent corruption. First, locate you Roaming Application Profiles. You will need to be an administrator to do this, but assuming you are, in Explorer select Tools > Folder Options > View tab (if Tools is not visible, hit Alt) and ensure the radio button for “Show hidden files, folders and drives” is selected and “Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)” is unchecked (you will be asked to confirm this).

Find your profile. This will be located in your home drive (probably C:) in the “Users” or “Documents and Settings” (for XP) folder, so in my case it is C:\Users\Keith. Ensuring you have Folder View open, click on the {profile} folder and in the right-hand pane locate AppData (or Local Settings\Application Data for XP). Within this is the folder “Roaming”, within which is the Firefox Profile folder, e.g. {profile}\AppData\Roaming\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles.

Beneath that is your random profile ID folder, which will be something like “1234abcd.default”. This folder I will call {fprofile}.

First, locate the pesky Conduit Engine folders, which contain most of the gubbins associated with this monster. Delete the folders {fprofile}\conduit and {fprofile}\CT2790392 (I can’t vouch for this exact number, but it seems to be standard at the moment).

Find the file {fprofile}\prefs.js and save a copy of this with a .backup extension. Right click on prefs.js and select “Edit”; this will (should) open the javascript file in Notepad.

You need to remove all references to Conduit:

First, delete every line beginning with the following:

user_pref("CT2790392. user_pref("CommunityToolbar.

Second, locate the following line:

user_pref("browser.search.defaulturl", "http://search.conduit.com/ResultsExt.aspx?ctid=CT2790392&SearchSource=3&q={searchTerms}");

Change it to (for Google search):

user_pref("browser.search.defaulturl", "http://www.google.com/search?lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=");

You will need to find the relevant command line for your own search engine, or just leave the second quotes empty for no URL bar searching.

Finally, locate the line:

user_pref("keyword.URL", "http://search.conduit.com/ResultsExt.aspx?ctid=CT2790392&q=");

and change it to (for Google): user_pref("keyword.URL", "http://www.google.com/search?lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=");

Again, you will need to find your own code for different search engines: I’m not a huge fan of Google, but at least you can just delete the cookie to remove your search history, or use Private Browsing.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 63363 times by 19725 viewers

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - February 6, 2012 at 9:24 am

Categories: Gadget   Tags: , , , , , , ,

SOPA V. Soapy: In 2012 Government and Big Business Will Understand How Powerless They Are In The Face Of Human Ingenuity

SOPA.  The Stop Online Piracy Act.

If you have a web browser open for most of the day, or you just happened to have badly misspelled soap in a Google search, you’ve come across SOPA.

 

In short, it’s bad. Cauliflower bad or (if you’re a some kind of deviant who actually likes the flavor of cream of evil vegetables) Tea Party bad.

The entertainment industry and, I suspect, some folks along the Republican side of the aisle, want the ability to block any website from view that could have possibly, maybe once, but we’re not really sure, hosted copyrighted content illegally. In principle, I get it. The entertainment companies would very much like to stop dumping millions of dollars into projects that have to actually be good in order to recoup their cost. The current state of affairs seems to be; “I create a crappy but mildly entertaining product, people get wind of the fact that it’s probably not going to be very good and therefore not worthy of their hard-earned money and they either download it illegally, or wait for it to arrive on DVD, OnDemand, or Netflix.

The simple solution, of course would be for content producers to stop churning out endless acres of crap. But that’s never going to happen. So we get SOPA; a nuclear option to stop the money from bleeding out.

But is the money bleeding out in enough quantities to warrant a nuclear option?

I really don’t think so.

The vast majority of consumers fall into what I call the baseline user class. They own at least one full computer (desktop/laptop) likely a smartphone and maybe (a very slim percentage so far but growing) a tablet of some sort.Maybe they do a bit of gaming but mostly they surf the internet, watch cat videos on YouTube, get a bit of work done and post embarrassing pictures of themselves and others on Facebook. That is the vast, vast majority of users. I’ve tried to explain to those of my friends that fall into this category how to use tools like Bittorrent to acquire free (or stolen, depending on the laws of the jurisdiction you happen to live in) content, but it mostly falls on incapable ears. Gone are the halcyon days of piracy through simple channels like Napster and Kazaa. Pirating in the modern era is much more efficient but also requires a bit more specialized knowledge and effort, two things that the baselines lack when it comes to entertainment.

When the average user thinks about digital content, it usually comes in convenient but paid for and licensed forms like iTunes, Pandora, Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon. The vast, vast majority of consumers pay for every single piece of digital content they consume. Sure, the way they’ve chosen to consume it means scaled down profits for content producer but, as Republicans and Tea Baggers love to remind everyone, the market determines value, not whatever you think something should be worth.

So why SOPA?

Power, control, censorship and a deep misunderstanding of the technological proficiency of the people who actually understand how the internet in general and piracy in particular work.

Congress believes, by virtue of the authority granted to them by those who’ve elected them, that they have power. The entertainment industry believes, by virtue of its billions of dollars in revenue, that they have power. The supporters of SOPA who aren’t tied to either of those spheres believe, by virtue of their influence over daily life on the internet (see GoDaddy) that they have power.

And they are all correct. But it is not true power, because it is utterly dependent on a combination of our tolerance and apathy, two traits which are mercifully shrinking within the populace at large.

Congress, for example, is filled with people who care not a bit for the desires of those who voted them into power. They care, almost exclusively, about pushing the agenda of their political party. They care about winning. But they can only do so if they are allowed to continue holding office, so they have to walk a tightrope between their own desires and not doing anything that the lowest common denominator of their electorate will find undesirable. Their power is derived from us and they can only exercise control over us to the extent that we allow it. At least in four year blocks.

Large service and content providers like those within the entertainment industry are subject to the same limitations. Yes, their money equates directly to power and influence. But they can only continue to exercise those advantages if we continue to give them money. Which is why the passage of SOPA is so important to them. They are trying to force us to pay for their schlock whether we care to or not and, really, it’s hard not to foresee a scenario where one of the major content providers decides that something hosted on Netflix somehow violates a copyright agreement and uses the broad powers of SOPA to blockade the legitimate services we choose to use in lieu of more expensive options. They want to dictate terms to the market. The reason that they’re being so brazen in their measures this time is, ironically, that the very same limitation that should make them think twice about so joyously biting the hands that feed them (our ability to effect a boycott of their services and thus drain them of all of their resources) is exactly the thing that we won’t exercise. Time and again (with the exception of the recent GoDaddy mass exodus) we’ve shown that when principle clashes with convenience, convenience wins. It is a frustrating flaw of the human condition.

However….

What both governments and corporations fail to understand is that individual mastery of technology within our culture has become such that, within the relatively small percentage of the population that doesn’t fall into the baseline category of users, there exist large pockets of individuals who have the power, from a keyboard, to thwart the concerted efforts of Big Business and Big Government with relative ease, especially when it comes to the field of internet censorship.

Case in point:

This morning I read this article that talks about a browser extension for Firefox called Soapy. Soapy is a tiny little script that can be downloaded and installed by anybody, into Firefox on any computer, by means of simply dragging the script file to your browser window. And its sole purpose is to change the way your browser looks up websites that have been blocked by SOPA and instantly navigate around ISP enabled blocks to allow you access to your content.

Before SOPA has even been passed, someone has found a way to render it moot. And this is just the first blow; this is just one guy, typing away from the comfort of his home office. Others will follow. It will become easier and easier for the baseline user to access tools that free them from the oppression of corporate and government interests, and that is a very good thing.

But why is it so easy?

Because the people who seek to control and censor online content don’t understand that  the internet isn’t a thing that they can contain within the laws of the land. It isn’t something that you can control. The internet is more than cables and connections and websites. It is, like Soylent Green, people.

And people, whether en masse or as individuals, will always find a way to remain free.

Even from the clutches of Sony Entertainment and the Tea Party.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Viewed 34507 times by 7655 viewers

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by plates55 - January 13, 2012 at 10:15 am

Categories: Censorship   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers