Posts tagged "Application programming interface"

Facebook and Microsoft partner on hackathon

On Monday, Microsoft and Facebook announced they will partner to host a hackathon at the Facebook offices in Menlo Park, Calif.

“A number of our engineers, along with Facebook’s engineers, will be there working with everyone to show how you can easily get deep integration across Windows and Windows Phone apps,” writes Steve Guggenheimer in a blog post. “We’ll be offering 1:1 assistance along with some great speakers that will help jumpstart any app efforts you have.”

In his blog post, Guggenheimer broke down a few key buckets that he hopes will get developers excited about what you can do with this event:

· Deliver Unique Consumer Experiences: Through the Facebook Login API for Windows and Windows Phone, developers can create unique consumer experiences due to the seamless integration with Microsoft products that consumers already use every day (i.e. Bing, Outlook and others.)

· Provide developers with scale and world-class tools: Shared code means developers spend less time coding and more time making apps interesting and easy to use. The common core across the Windows platform helps developers scale their resources quickly to build Facebook-connected apps across multiple devices though reusable codes, libraries and other helpful open-sourced tools.

· Policy. Evolving macro topics to improve tech and economy:  Since 2007, Microsoft and Facebook have partnered to evolve both technology and the macroeconomics that impact technical employees and consumers. This latest developer toolkit is just one example of the way Microsoft and Facebook continue to help developers of all skillsets be successful on the platforms.

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Posted by plates55 - January 6, 2014 at 3:28 pm

Categories: Microsoft   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Towards Interoperable Pointer Events: Evolving Input Events for Multiple Devices

Today, the W3C has accepted and published Microsoft’s member submission describing a new way for Web sites to support multiple pointing devices such as mouse, pen, and multi-touch. Our proposal for a new Pointer Events Web standard is based on the APIs available today in IE10 on Windows 8.

The Web is more exciting and interactive for users when sites enable experiences for multi-touch. It is even better when the same site continues to work if you switch to using a mouse or pen. We believe the Web should not be fragmented into sites designed for only one type of input. We designed Pointer Events to make it easier for developers to avoid this fragmentation by abstracting the differences of input devices while still allowing for device-specific enhancements when desired.

Our goal with this submission is to work with other browser vendors and the wider Web community to move to adopt a new approach to multi-touch input. In the future, we hope that Web developers will only need to write to one pointer input model no matter if their users are using mouse, pen, touch, or whatever comes next.  The W3C noted, “This Submission comes at a time of significant developer concern about creating content that works well on multiple input modalities, and in light of some disadvantages to the touch event model currently under standardization.”

Other approaches to supporting multi-touch input require Web developers to write their code once for mouse input and again for touch, dealing with the sometimes complex interactions between the two models (for example, when touch events are mapped to mouse events for compatibility). Throughout the development of IE10, and thanks to your feedback, we designed the Pointer Events model to be more compatible with the existing Web and avoid these complexities.

We encourage you to review the proposal and share your thoughts. The specification is a starting point and calls out several open issues for discussion and we look forward to making improvements based on your feedback

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Posted by plates55 - September 28, 2012 at 7:04 am

Categories: Microsoft   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Building the next generation file system for Windows 8: ReFS

Another extensive blogpoost on the Building Windows 8 blog:

 

ReFS, has been designed from the ground up to meet a broad set of customer requirements, both today’s and tomorrow’s, for all the different ways that Windows is deployed.

The key goals of ReFS are:

  • Maintain a high degree of compatibility with a subset of NTFS features that are widely adopted while deprecating others that provide limited value at the cost of system complexity and footprint.
  • Verify and auto-correct data. Data can get corrupted due to a number of reasons and therefore must be verified and, when possible, corrected automatically. Metadata must not be written in place to avoid the possibility of “torn writes,” which we will talk about in more detail below.
  • Optimize for extreme scale. Use scalable structures for everything. Don’t assume that disk-checking algorithms, in particular, can scale to the size of the entire file system.
  • Never take the file system offline. Assume that in the event of corruptions, it is advantageous to isolate the fault while allowing access to the rest of the volume. This is done while salvaging the maximum amount of data possible, all done live.
  • Provide a full end-to-end resiliency architecture when used in conjunction with the Storage Spaces feature, which was co-designed and built in conjunction with ReFS.

The key features of ReFS are as follows (note that some of these features are provided in conjunction with Storage Spaces).

  • Metadata integrity with checksums
  • Integrity streams providing optional user data integrity
  • Allocate on write transactional model for robust disk updates (also known as copy on write)
  • Large volume, file and directory sizes
  • Storage pooling and virtualization makes file system creation and management easy
  • Data striping for performance (bandwidth can be managed) and redundancy for fault tolerance
  • Disk scrubbing for protection against latent disk errors
  • Resiliency to corruptions with “salvage” for maximum volume availability in all cases
  • Shared storage pools across machines for additional failure tolerance and load balancing

In addition, ReFS inherits the features and semantics from NTFS including BitLocker encryption, access-control lists for security, USN journal, change notifications, symbolic links, junction points, mount points, reparse points, volume snapshots, file IDs, and oplocks.

And of course, data stored on ReFS is accessible through the same file access APIs on clients that are used on any operating system that can access today’s NTFS volumes.

NTFS.SYS = NTFS upper layer API/semantics engine / NTFS on-disk store engine; ReFS.SYS = Upper layer engine inherited from NTFS / New on-disk store engine

 

Continue at source!!

MSDN Blogs

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Posted by plates55 - January 19, 2012 at 8:24 am

Categories: Windows8   Tags: , , , , , , ,

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